UKSG 2014

The UKSG annual conference was a busy but informative couple of days, packed with interesting talks, chance to meet people as well as sample a few beers at the conference dinner. Videos & slides and blog posts about the sessions are available on the UKSG site.

There were numerous themes running across the talks however the two which stood out for me and were also key to my presentation were Openess and Collaboration. A core founding principle of KB+ is ensuring the title lists are openly available while collaboration is key to how we continue to develop the service.

This post covers the panel session, KB+ putting theory into practice

I am very grateful to Sonia Wilson from University of Stirling and Phil Hall from Proquest Workflow Solutions who joined me on the panel session. The aim of our session was to show how KB+ is used from different perspectives.

I began the session by introducing KB+ and putting it into context with regards to why the service was created and what it looks like to date. One of my key roles in working with KB+ is with regards to adding data to the knowledgebase, data which we then make openly available to benefit the whole community. Most of what we have achieved is through collaboration and by working together I hope we can create a trusted knowledge base to be used as an authoritative source which in turn will benefit everyone involved, librarians, vendors and publishers.

Sonia talked about how University of Stirling became involved with KB+ and their expectations of the service in terms of how it could help the library. Stirling have been involved with KB+ from the beginning and noted how much the system has changed in answer to demands from the community although there are still areas they would like to see further developed. I was pleased to hear Sonia echo the need for more collaboration and contribution from the community in order for KB+ to provide even more value.

 

Ending our panel was Phil who was able to talk about how Proquest Workflow Solutions are making use of the data we provide from KB+ and integrating it within their knowledgebase allowing customers to benefit from the title list without an increase to their workload. It was encouraging to see the KB+ title list being used and hopefully the right step towards reducing multiple versions of title list which currently create confusion and more work.

Jisc Inform article

Jisc Inform

Jisc Inform, the charity’s termly online magazine, published a look at KB+ in their spring edition. It includes a round-up of the work so far and a look into the future of KB+.

You can sign up to receive Jisc Inform and keep up-to-date with all things education, research and technology!

Making the most of JUSP

JUSPI was pleased to be invited to attend a ‘Making the most out of JUSP’ KB+workshop to talk about how JUSP and KB+ have been working together. It was a really useful day in terms of gaining a better understanding of the benefits JUSP provides to institutions and also how they have worked in building an engaged and enthusiastic community. I was also pleased to be able to chat about e-resources with librarians, something I never tire of.

The day started with a presentation from Tim Peacock, from the University of Derby and their experience of using JUSP, his talk concluded with some questions which were a useful springboard for discussion amongst the table with regards how they use JUSP, who in the institution they need to share the data with etc. Tim noted that the content coverage in JUSP does not cover all the titles which they subscribe to, this is also the case for KB+ and I can see an opportunity to work together to help prioritise and increase our knowledge base coverage.

JUSP provided practical exercises for groups to work through which highlight the available reports, features and functionality of the system. Judging from the animated discussion and buzz in the room these exercises were really successful and is something I think would be useful to try with KB+.

For my presentation I talked about our similar core foundations in terms of both being a shared service and the importance of collaboration with the community to create systems fit for need. JUSP and KB+ grew from a need to help tackle challenges faced across many institutions and in providing a national solution we offer the opportunity to reduce time and effort.

The need for integration between KB+ and JUSP has  been echoed in both communities so I was pleased to demonstrate how you can view JR1 stats in KB+ and also that JUSP are making use of the title lists created in KB+. We have further plans for more effective data sharing between the systems, including aiming to allow institutions to only mark up titles in one system and then sharing this with the other system which again will hopefully save time and effort.

The day ended with a recap of some of the new developments in JUSP including a website refresh, the introduction of Usage Profiling, Counter 4 and discussions with vendors regarding interoperability between systems and use of the JUSP API.

An enjoyable and useful day which I hope is the start of more joint events. Presentations from the day will shortly be available from the JUSP website.

Maximising the Knowledge Base at UKSG 2013 Conference

Liam recently attended the annual UKSG conference and delivered a presentation on ‘Maximising the Knowledge Base’ which you can watch below.

The conference was packed with interesting and inspirational presentations and even though I wasn’t able to attend I was very pleased to be able to

Editorial on KB+ for UKSG eNews

We put together an overview of KB+ for UKSG eNews.

It provides a good overview of the project aims, outputs and plans for the future as of July 2012.

The article is available at: Knowledge Base+ for UKSG subscribers, or on the JISC Collections web site a: http://www.jisc-collections.ac.uk/News/kbplus/

Presentation to Ex Libris User Group for UK and Ireland

I was recently invited to give a presentation to the Ex Libris User Group for UK and Ireland, on the KB+.

As a statement of how we got to where we are and where we hope to take the project in the future it is fairly complete.

Slides are available on slideshare